Terribly British

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Me & Yu t-shirt and paisley skirt

You might be British if:

  1. your beverage of choice is ‘a nice cup of tea’.
  2. if a passerby accidentally bumps into you in the supermarket, your response is ‘sorry about that’.
  3. you’ve been known to switch on the TV and say ‘oh good, One Man And His Dog is on’.
  4. when your local charity shop having a fill-a-bag sale you only fill it to half/three quarters full because you don’t want to be rude.

Continue reading “Terribly British”

More socks

angee socks

Knitting socks is developing into an obsession of mine, but that’s fine because during the winter it’s nice to cosy up indoors of an evening and do some knitting.
For these beauties, I followed Cookie A’s Angee pattern, which is available in Sock Innovation. The yarn is cotton, and although the navy looks smart, a paler colour would probably display the stitching better. Now that I understand the principles of sock knitting, I’m sketching out my own designs. What would you like to see on a pair of socks? My current idea involves hearts and kisses.

angee socks 2

Blue scarf

northwest is best blue scarf

Alexandra Thérèse asked how I made the above scarf (worn in this outfit), so I decided to tell all of you in a blog post. If you’re looking for an easy to knit scarf, this is the one. It stays flat and the stitching is the same on both sides.
I used two balls of Sirdar’s Big Softie, which is a soft and cosy wool in lots of bright colours (the blue I chose is called Jazzy). On 10mm needles, I cast on a multiple of three (21, I think), then each row was knit two, purl one.

Chic cyclist

northwest is best skirted cyclistThere are many reasons why cycling is my main mode of transport, and one of the biggest reasons is that I enjoy it. Similarly, there are many reasons why other people will say ‘I’d love to take up cycling, but…‘ One of those reasons is clothing. You can roll eyes and call me vain but it’s a valid concern for women and men – if you wear a suit to work and your office only provides a toilet cubicle as a changing facility, how are you supposed to commute on your bike?

Here are a few tips from my experience. Tips, I must emphasise. Although I cycle most days I’m not an expert and still learning – I’m just an internet friend sharing my advice.

  • Cycling in a skirt isn’t a problem for me. I don’t feel self-conscious about my legs, and doubt anyone is looking. Sometimes I hear someone shouting ‘hey sexy legs!‘ or similar as I pass, but I’m too busy concentrating on, you know, cycling. If you do feel self-consious, just wear trousers or shorts underneath your skirt, then change at your destination. When I’m wearing a longer skirt than the one pictured above, I’ll just roll it up or pin it together with safety pins. You can get skirt guards to prevent your clothes getting caught in the spokes.
  • Wearing a helmet isn’t mandatory in the UK. We could spend a long time debating the pros and cons of helmet use, but I think it’s a good idea to protect your noggin. As you can see in this pictures, I’m not wearing one but I was on the off road Fallowfield Loop.
  • Gloves will protect your hands – and not just from windchill. If you do unfortunately come off your bike, you’ll instinctively put out your hands to protect yourself. When rollerblading once I took a tumble, and was picking gravel out of my palms for days. Not pleasant.
  • Shoes need to be sensible. Cycling in heels is not only possible, but also encouraged by some. I have a few pairs of flats that I cycle in because of the risk of puddle splashback. I especially like these studded flats as they have a T-bar – ballet flats would just fall off.
  • Staying visible is important. When cycling after dark I have several lights and various reflective clothing. Even if you’re not cycling on the roads it’s safer to be seen, and you won’t be scaring pedestrians.
  • I cycle in all weathers, and don’t mind arriving to my destination looking a bit windswept. It makes me feel like Eliza Bennet, rosy-cheeked and muddy-skirted, tramping across the countryside to Netherfield. If you do mind there’s no shame in being a fair weather cyclist.
scarf – handknitted by me // brooch – a gift // coat – charity shop // shoes – stead & simpson
northwest is best handknitted scarf stone boar northwest is best we hate turner and hooch

Emo socks

northwest is best stitch n bitch skull socks

 

There are many reasons why cycling is my main mode of transport, and one of the biggest reasons is that I enjoy it. Similarly, there are many reasons why other people will say ‘I’d love to take up cycling, but…’ One of those reasons is clothing. You can roll eyes and call me vain but it’s a valid concern for women and men – if you wear a suit to work and your office only provides a toilet cubicle as a changing facility, how are you supposed to commute on your bike?

Here are a few tips from my experience. Tips, I must emphasise. Although I cycle most days I’m not an expert and still learning – I’m just an internet friend sharing my advice.

Cycling in a skirt isn’t a problem for me. I don’t feel self-conscious about my legs, and doubt anyone is looking. Sometimes I hear someone shouting ‘hey sexy legs!’ or similar as I pass, but I’m too busy concentrating on, you know, cycling. If you do feel self-consious, just wear trousers or shorts underneath your skirt, then change at your destination. When I’m wearing a longer skirt than the one pictured above, I’ll just roll it up or pin it together with safety pins. You can get skirt guards to prevent your clothes getting caught in the spokes.
Wearing a helmet isn’t mandatory in the UK. We could spend a long time debating the pros and cons of helmet use, but I think it’s a good idea to protect your noggin. As you can see in this pictures, I’m not wearing one but I was on the off road Fallowfield Loop.
Gloves will protect your hands – and not just from windchill. If you do unfortunately come off your bike, you’ll instinctively put out your hands to protect yourself. When rollerblading once I took a tumble, and was picking gravel out of my palms for days. Not pleasant.
Shoes need to be sensible. Cycling in heels is not only possible, but also encouraged by some. I have a few pairs of flats that I cycle in because of the risk of puddle splashback. I especially like these studded flats as they have a T-bar – ballet flats would just fall off.
Staying visible is important. When cycling after dark I have several lights and various reflective clothing. Even if you’re not cycling on the roads it’s safer to be seen, and you won’t be scaring pedestrians.
I cycle in all weathers, and don’t mind arriving to my destination looking a bit windswept. It makes me feel like Eliza Bennet, rosy-cheeked and muddy-skirted, tramping across the countryside to Netherfield. If you do mind there’s no shame in being a fair weather cyclist.

scarf – handknitted by me // brooch – a gift // coat – charity shop // shoes – stead & simpson

northwest is best stitch n bitch skull socks 2

Workspace

northwest is best favourite books

Are you nosy? A bit of a voyeur? Enjoy peering into other people’s personal spaces? If so, you can go an admire my workspace on the delightful Oranges and Apples, along with other blogger workspaces. Doesn’t a view into my world have some wonderful books? And can you stop yourself feeling jealous at Veronica Darling’s sewing room?
Pictured above are some of my favourite books. Only some, however. If I was really pretentious, I would have included War and Peace. But my dad is currently borrowing my copy.